„I begin with an idea and then it becomes something else. After all, what is a painter? He is a collector who gets what he likes in others by painting them himself. This is how I begin and then it becomes something else.“

—  Пабло Пикассо, Quoted in: Ann Livermore (1988), Artists and Aesthetics in Spain. p. 154
Пабло Пикассо фото
Пабло Пикассо85
испанский художник, скульптор и график 1881 - 1973
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