„It is a lie if we tell ourselves that the police can protect us everywhere, at all times. Firearms restrictions are bad enough, but now a woman can't even carry Mace in her purse?“

—  Тимоти Маквей, 1990s, Letter to John J. LaFalce (1992)
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