„I am not saying that gas chambers did not exist. I did not see them myself. I haven't studied the questions specially. But I believe it is a minor point in the history of the Second World War.“

—  Жан-Мари Ле Пен, Controversial statement on the Holocaust (13 September 1987), in which he referred to the Nazi gas chambers as a "minor point" [point de detail] in the history of the Second World War, as quoted in Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1993) http://books.google.com/books?id=b8IvAAAAYAAJ&q=%22But+I+believe+that+it+is+a+minor+point
Жан-Мари Ле Пен фото
Жан-Мари Ле Пен1
французский политик, депутат Европарламента 1928
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