„What was this intellectual well-poisoning?“

—  Róbert Puzsér, Quotes from him, Csillag születik (talent show between 2011-2012), Mi volt ez a szellemi kútmérgezés?
Оригинальный контент

Mi volt ez a szellemi kútmérgezés?

Róbert Puzsér фото
Róbert Puzsér21
hungarian publicist 1974
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