„Wherefore not without cause has one of your own followers asked, "If God is, whence come evil things? If He is not, whence come good?"“

Prose IV, line 30; translation by W.V. Cooper
The Consolation of Philosophy · De Consolatione Philosophiae, Book I
Добавить примечание: (la) Unde haud iniuria tuorum quidam familiarium quaesiuit: `si quidem deus', inquit, `est, unde mala? Bona uero unde, si non est?

Последнее обновление 24 мая 2020 г. История
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