„You mean like Democrats?“

—  Боб Хоуп, In the film The Ghost Breakers (1940), in reference to another character's description of zombies: ""you see them sometimes walking around blindly with dead eyes, following orders, not knowing what they do, not caring."" [Misattributed: Actor not credited as writer. ]
Боб Хоуп фото
Боб Хоуп3
американский актёр, певец и танцор 1903 - 2003
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