„A country cannot subsist well without liberty, nor liberty without virtue.“

As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, Both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tryon Edwards, p. 301.

Взято из Wikiquote. Последнее обновление 3 июня 2021 г. История
Жан-Жак Руссо фото
Жан-Жак Руссо93
французский деятель эпохи Просвещения 1712 - 1778

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