„What we call National-Socialism is the poisonous perversion of ideas which have a long history in German intellectual life.“

—  Томас Манн, The War and the Future, Speech, "The War and the Future" (1940); published in Order of the Day (1942)
Томас Манн фото
Томас Манн39
немецкий писатель, эссеист, лауреат Нобелевской премии 1875 - 1955

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