„We don't need to give away flags for our fans to wave - our supporters are always there with their hearts, and that is all we need. It's the passion of the fans that helps to win matches - not flags.“

Рафаэль Бенитес фото
Рафаэль Бенитес1
испанский футбольный тренер 1960
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