„Who in the same given time can produce more than others has vigor; who can produce more and better, has talents; who can produce what none else can, has genius.“

Иоганн Каспар Лафатер фото
Иоганн Каспар Лафатер8
швейцарский немецкоязычный писатель, теолог и поэт 1741 - 1801
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