„The question must also be raised as to whether we have the actual words of Jesus in any Gospel.“

—  Спонг, Джон Шелби, Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism (1991), p. 78
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„The kind of problem that literature raises is not the kind that you ever 'solve'. Whether my answers are any good or not, they represent a fair amount of thinking about the questions.“

—  Northrop Frye Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991
"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 1: The Motive For Metaphor http://northropfrye-theeducatedimagination.blogspot.ca/2009/08/1-motive-for-metaphor.html

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„use questions to raise questions“

—  Os Guinness American writer 1941
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„We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being correct.“

—  Niels Bohr Danish physicist 1885 - 1962
Said to Wolfgang Pauli after his presentation of Heisenberg's and Pauli's nonlinear field theory of elementary particles, at Columbia University (1958), as reported by F. J. Dyson in his paper “Innovation in Physics” (Scientific American, 199, No. 3, September 1958, pp. 74-82; reprinted in "JingShin Theoretical Physics Symposium in Honor of Professor Ta-You Wu," edited by Jong-Ping Hsu & Leonardo Hsu, Singapore; River Edge, NJ: World Scientific, 1998, pp. 73-90, here: p. 84). Your theory is crazy, but it's not crazy enough to be true. As quoted in First Philosophy: The Theory of Everything (2007) by Spencer Scoular, p. 89 There are many slight variants on this remark: We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question which divides us is whether it is crazy enough. We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question is whether it is crazy enough to be have a chance of being correct. We in the back are convinced your theory is crazy. But what divides us is whether it is crazy enough. Your theory is crazy, the question is whether it's crazy enough to be true. Yes, I think that your theory is crazy. Sadly, it's not crazy enough to be believed.

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„Yes, Jesus faced the question of war.“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957
The Sword or the Cross, Which Should be the Weapon of the Christian Militant? (1921), Context: Restless under this tyranny, the Jewish people were eagerly awaiting the coming of the Messiah, who should overthrow the conqueror and bring about freedom.... It was into this atmosphere that Jesus came. His country was in disgraceful bondage to imperialistic and militaristic Rome. His countrymen were waiting with intense eagerness for the Messiah, who should lead them to victory and freedom and glory.... Yes, Jesus faced the question of war.... One of the great temptations of his life came at this point.... He loathes and detests the odious oppression which is wearing out the life of his people. Ch.3 p. 51-55

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„We have now to ask whether God made the tapeworm. And it is questionable whether an affirmative answer fits in either with what we know about the process of evolution or what many of us believe about the moral perfection of God.“

—  J. B. S. Haldane, book The Causes of Evolution
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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“