„... glad applause and the heaven-flung shout of the populace.“
Laetifici plausus missusque ad sidera vulgi clamor.

—  Публий Папиний Стаций, Line 521 (tr. J. H. Mozley)
Публий Папиний Стаций фото
Публий Папиний Стаций4
латинский поэт 40 - 96
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