„There is this peculiarity in our country—the only men who can be trusted with human liberty are the ones who are not to be angels hereafter.“

—  Роберт Грин Ингерсолл, Context: I account in part for the civilization of America by the fact that our fathers were wise enough, and jealous of each other enough, to absolutely divorce church and state. They regarded the church as a dangerous mistress—one not fit to govern a president. This divorce was obtained because men like Jefferson and Paine were at that time prominent in the councils of the people. There is this peculiarity in our country—the only men who can be trusted with human liberty are the ones who are not to be angels hereafter. Liberty is safe so long as the sinners have an opportunity to be heard.
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—  Charlie Chaplin British comic actor and filmmaker 1889 - 1977
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