„When I gaze at a sunset sky and spend hours contemplating its marvelous ever-changing beauty, an extraordinary emotion overwhelms me. Nature in all its vastness is truthfully reflected in my sincere though feeble soul.“

—  Клод Дебюсси, Context: I do not practise religion in accordance with the sacred rites. I have made mysterious Nature my religion. I do not believe that a man is any nearer to God for being clad in priestly garments, nor that one place in a town is better adapted to meditation than another. When I gaze at a sunset sky and spend hours contemplating its marvelous ever-changing beauty, an extraordinary emotion overwhelms me. Nature in all its vastness is truthfully reflected in my sincere though feeble soul. Around me are the trees stretching up their branches to the skies, the perfumed flowers gladdening the meadow, the gentle grass-carpetted earth, … and my hands unconsciously assume an attitude of adoration. … To feel the supreme and moving beauty of the spectacle to which Nature invites her ephemeral guests! … that is what I call prayer. As quoted in Claude Debussy: His Life and Works (1933) by Léon Vallas, p. 225 Variant translation: Before the passing sky, in long hours of contemplation of its magnificent and ever-changing beauty, I am seized by an incomparable emotion. The whole expanse of nature is reflected in my own sincere and feeble soul. Around me the branches of trees reach out toward the firmament, here are sweet-scented flowers smiling in the meadow, here the soft earth is carpeted with sweet herbs. … Nature invites its ephemeral and trembling travelers to experience these wonderful and disturbing spectacles — that is what I call prayer. As quoted in The Life of the Creative Spirit (2001) by H. Charles Romesburg, p. 240
Клод Дебюсси фото
Клод Дебюсси9
Французский композитор, музыкальный критик 1862 - 1918
Реклама

Похожие цитаты

Johannes Kepler фото

„I contemplate its beauty with incredible and ravishing delight“

—  Johannes Kepler German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer 1571 - 1630
Context: I certainly know that I owe it [the Copernican theory] this duty, that as I have attested it as true in my deepest soul, and as I contemplate its beauty with incredible and ravishing delight, I should also publicly defend it to my readers with all the force at my command. Vol. VI, p. 116, Vol. VIII, p. 266ff.

Honoré de Balzac фото
Реклама
Albert Einstein фото

„It is enough for me to contemplate the mystery of conscious life perpetuating itself through all eternity, to reflect upon the marvelous structure of the universe which we dimly perceive, and to try humbly to comprehend an infinitesimal part of the intelligence manifested in nature.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
As quoted in Introduction to Philosophy (1935) by George Thomas White Patrick and Frank Miller Chapman, p. 44 Variant translations: I am satisfied with the mystery of life's eternity and with a knowledge, a sense, of the marvelous structure of existence — as well as the humble attempt to understand even a tiny portion of the Reason that manifests itself in nature. Enough for me the mystery of the eternity of life, and the inkling of the marvellous structure of reality, together with the single-hearted endeavor to comprehend a portion, be it never so tiny, of the reason that manifests itself in nature.

Newton Lee фото
Meher Baba фото

„This whole universe, with all its vastness, grandeur and beauty, is nothing but sheer imagination.“

—  Meher Baba Indian mystic 1894 - 1969
Context: This whole universe, with all its vastness, grandeur and beauty, is nothing but sheer imagination. In spite of so many discoveries, researches and scientific knowledge, the creation remains a great unsolved riddle. Message in Bombay (October 1922), p. 431.

Lewis Pugh фото
Anne Brontë фото

„My God! O let me call Thee mine!
Weak, wretched sinner though I be,
My trembling soul would fain be Thine,
My feeble faith still clings to Thee.“

—  Anne Brontë British novelist and poet 1820 - 1849
Context: My God! O let me call Thee mine! Weak, wretched sinner though I be, My trembling soul would fain be Thine, My feeble faith still clings to Thee.

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel фото

„Our task does not require us to contemplate Nature as a Rational System in itself though in its own proper domain it proves itself such but simply in its relation to Spirit.“

—  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel German philosopher 1770 - 1831
Context: The enquiry into the essential destiny of Reason as far as it is considered in reference to the World is identical with the question, what is the ultimate design of the World? And the expression implies that that design is destined to be realised! Two points of consideration suggest themselves: first, the import of this design its abstract definition; and secondly, its realization. It must be observed at the outset, that the phenomenon we investigate Universal History belongs to the realm of Spirit. The term “World" includes both physical and psychical Nature. Physical Nature also plays its part in the World's History, and attention will have to be paid to the fundamental natural relations thus involved. But Spirit, and the course of its development, is our substantial object. Our task does not require us to contemplate Nature as a Rational System in itself though in its own proper domain it proves itself such but simply in its relation to Spirit. On the stage on which we are observing it, Universal History Spirit displays itself in its most concrete reality. Notwithstanding this (or rather for the very purpose of comprehending the general principles which this, its form of concrete reality, embodies) we must premise some abstract characteristics of the nature of Spirit. Such an explanation, however, cannot be given here under any other form than that of bare assertion. The present is not the occasion for unfolding the idea of Spirit speculatively; for whatever has a place in an Introduction, must, as already observed, be taken as simply historical; something assumed as having been explained and proved elsewhere; or whose demonstration awaits the sequel of the Science of History itself. Lectures on the History of History Vol 1 p. 17 John Sibree translation (1857), 1914

Реклама
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley фото

„My greatest pleasure was the enjoyment of a serene sky amidst these verdant woods: yet I loved all the changes of Nature; and rain, and storm, and the beautiful clouds of heaven brought their delights with them.“

—  Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer 1797 - 1851
Context: My greatest pleasure was the enjoyment of a serene sky amidst these verdant woods: yet I loved all the changes of Nature; and rain, and storm, and the beautiful clouds of heaven brought their delights with them. When rocked by the waves of the lake my spirits rose in triumph as a horseman feels with pride the motions of his high fed steed. But my pleasures arose from the contemplation of nature alone, I had no companion: my warm affections finding no return from any other human heart were forced to run waste on inanimate objects. Matilda (1819)

Edgar Degas фото

„Boredom soon overcomes me when I am contemplating nature.“

—  Edgar Degas French artist 1834 - 1917
Notebook entry (1858), The Notebooks of Edgar Degas, ed. Theodore Reff (1976)

Gulzarilal Nanda фото
Pablo Neruda фото
Реклама
Jorge Semprún фото
Henri Barbusse фото
Dan Simmons фото

„The most marvelous and far-reaching change which man ever undergoes is in his moral character and spiritual nature.“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957
Context: The most significant change in a man is not the change in his bodily strength or mental capacity. The most marvelous and far-reaching change which man ever undergoes is in his moral character and spiritual nature. p. 33