Рёкан Тайгу цитаты

Рёкан Тайгу фото
0  0

Рёкан Тайгу

Дата рождения: 1758
Дата смерти: 1831

Реклама

Рёкан Тайгу — японский писатель, философ, каллиграф и мыслитель

Цитаты Рёкан Тайгу

„Cling to truth and it turns into falsehood. Understand falsehood and it turns into truth.“

—  Ryōkan
Context: Cling to truth and it turns into falsehood. Understand falsehood and it turns into truth. Truth and falsehood are two sides of the same coin. Neither accept one nor reject the other. As translated in 1,001 Pearls of Wisdom (2006) by David Ross, p. 36

„You must rise above
The gloomy clouds“

—  Ryōkan
Context: You must rise above The gloomy clouds Covering the mountaintop Otherwise, how will you Ever see the brightness? As translated in Lust for Enlightenment : Buddhism and Sex (1990) by John Stevens, p. 117

Реклама

„Easily moved by beauty—such is my nature.“

—  Ryōkan
Context: Easily moved by beauty—such is my nature. I take a few phrases and they just turn into poems As translated in Great Fool: Zen Master Ryōkan; Poems, Letters, and Other Writings (1996) by Ryūichi Abé and Peter Haskel, p. 117

„The rain has stopped, the clouds have drifted away, and the weather is clear again.“

—  Ryōkan
Context: The rain has stopped, the clouds have drifted away, and the weather is clear again. If your heart is pure, then all things in your world are pure. Abandon this fleeting world, abandon yourself, Then the moon and flowers will guide you along the Way.

„In this dream world
We doze
And talk of dreams —“

—  Ryōkan
Context: In this dream world We doze And talk of dreams — Dream, dream on, As much as you wish As translated in Lust for Enlightenment : Buddhism and Sex (1990) by John Stevens, p. 28

„Was it only a dream? Was I really young once?“

—  Ryōkan
Context: Late at night, listening to the winter rain Recalling my youth — Was it only a dream? Was I really young once? As quoted in One Robe, One Bowl : The Zen Poetry of Ryōkan (2006) edited by John Stevens, p. 71

„I take these words as an admonition to myself.“

—  Ryōkan
Context: When you encounter those who are wicked, unrighteous, foolish, dim-witted, deformed, vicious, chronically ill, lonely, unfortunate, or disabled, you should think: “How can I save them?” And even if there is nothing you can do, at least you must not indulge in feelings of arrogance, superiority, derision, scorn, or abhorrence, but should immediately manifest sympathy and compassion. If you fail to do so, you should feel ashamed and deeply reproach yourself: “How far I have strayed from the Way! How can I betray the old sages? I take these words as an admonition to myself.”

„In the scenery of spring,
nothing is better, nothing worse“

—  Ryōkan
Context: In the scenery of spring, nothing is better, nothing worse; The flowering branches are of themselves, some short, some long. As translated in Haiku : Spring (1950) by Reginald Horace Blyth

Реклама

„When you encounter those who are wicked, unrighteous, foolish, dim-witted, deformed, vicious, chronically ill, lonely, unfortunate, or disabled, you should think: “How can I save them?”“

—  Ryōkan
Context: When you encounter those who are wicked, unrighteous, foolish, dim-witted, deformed, vicious, chronically ill, lonely, unfortunate, or disabled, you should think: “How can I save them?” And even if there is nothing you can do, at least you must not indulge in feelings of arrogance, superiority, derision, scorn, or abhorrence, but should immediately manifest sympathy and compassion. If you fail to do so, you should feel ashamed and deeply reproach yourself: “How far I have strayed from the Way! How can I betray the old sages? I take these words as an admonition to myself.”

Реклама

„The thief left it behind:
the moon
at my window.“

—  Ryōkan
Written after a thief robbed his hut, as translated in The Enlightened Heart: An Anthology of Sacred Poetry‎ (1993) by Stephen Mitchell, p. 162

„It's a pity, a gentleman in refined retirement composing poetry:
He models his work on the classic verse of China.
And his poems are elegant, full of fine phrases.
But if you don't write of things deep in your own heart,
What's the use of churning out so many words?“

—  Ryōkan
Variant translation: With gaudy words their lines are formed And further adorned by novel and curious phrases. Yet if they fail to express what is in their own minds What is the use, no matter How many poems they compose! "Zen Poetics of Ryokan" in Simply Haiku: A Quarterly Journal of Japanese Short Form Poetry (Summer 2006)

Далее
Годовщины сегодня
Егише Чаренц фото
Егише Чаренц2
армянский поэт 1897 - 1937
Клод Дебюсси фото
Клод Дебюсси9
Французский композитор, музыкальный критик 1862 - 1918
Другие 67 годовщин
Подобные авторы
Иккю Содзюн фото
Иккю Содзюн2
японский дзэн-буддийский монах, поэт, художник, каллиграф...
Йозеф Вахал фото
Йозеф Вахал1
Йозеф Вахал